New Pattern: Wildflower Tank

The Spring 2012 issue of Interweave Knits is now available, so I can share with you some exciting news- my Wildflower Tank is in it!

Wildflower Tank, Interweave Knits Spring 2012

I actually knit this in the summer of 2011, and made a few more changes in the fall, but I’m really happy with the results. it’ s knit in 100% mulberry silk and feels amazing on.

At the time, we took some test shots, even though I knew I was going to redo the back later on. It has about 1″ positive ease on me, and I recommend a little bit of ease, so that the silk can drape. For those that think a drawstring i-cord is way too much i-cord, i bet you could easily crochet chain a drawstring instead- it would be much faster.

Wildflower Tank, my shots
 Note: a black strapless bra under this was a bad choice. Wish I had worn the skin coloured one.

I had a hard time imagining summer knitting already until I saw the issue preview- now I’m excited about summer knitting!

Modification Monday: Na Craga Cardiganized

Original Pattern: Na Craga

Knitter Extraordinaire: Beata (Ravelry ID, )

Mods: Transformed the original pullover into a more modern cardigan, with adjustments to the neckline and shoulder construction.  Project page can be found here.

What Makes This Awesome: The original sweater is a gorgeous Aran, but very ‘classic’ in it’s shape and cut. Beata modernized it immensely by transforming it into an oversized v-neck cardigan, while maintaining the great Aran textured stitches throughout, and lengthening the body for a drapey-er fit. The result is amazing! I wish this was hanging in my closet right now.

New Pattern: Strada Headband

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Who says winter accessories can’t be glam? 
Strada is the finished pattern for the headband I designed and knitted for my cousin for Christmas. It’s a quick project that could easily be done in one day or over the weekend, and (as I can personally attest) it makes an awesome gift!
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The pattern is $4, and can be purchased by clicking the ‘buy now’ button below:
  
or you can check out the pattern on Ravelry here.

The details:
This is a one-size-fits-most pattern, but it is easy to make it smaller or larger- just knit the bands a little longer or shorter, as needed. It’s easy to hold it around your head while still on the needles to ensure a good fit. I knit this on two (4mm (US 6) dpns. The bow is knit flat, seamed, and sewn onto the headband with just a few stitches at each bow end to keep it attached.

Yarn: 1 skein of Tanis Fiber Arts Yellow Label DK weight (it will take approximately half a skein, so you can make two!) in ‘Brick’ 

Needles: 4mm (US 6)

And of course, a tapestry needle and a button for the back closure.

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You know, when my cousin first requested the headband, I was really dubious- I just couldn’t imagine how a big bow could look… grown up. But the trick is proportion- the bow isn’t too big and showy, and it’s not too small and twee. Positioning it on the side gives this headband a lot more 1920s style, I think. My cousin was right- a headband with a bow IS awesome.

Wee Wednesday: Booties

yellow booties
blue booties 2
I know, I know- murky indoor nighttime shots are the worst! I was too impatient to wait until the weekend. 

Pattern: Lavish Baby Booties

Yarn: Elann Peruvian Baby Cashmere (the blue ones) and Koigu painter’s Palette Premium merino (yellow)

Mods: The blue ones are exactly as the pattern, but the yellow are just the stockinette version of the same pattern.

Notes: I feel like this would be much better knit in a DK weight yarn, as the
4mm needles seemed a little large for the fingering weight, but then
again, I bet that gives the booties some extra stretch for when those
little feet start growing quickly.

blue booties
yellow booties 2

I knit the blue booties first,but wasn’t sure how I felt about the garter stitch. So I experimented with the stockinette, and I think I really like both of them- for different reasons. I am planning on embroidering the yellow ones, but I was thinking of putting her name on them. So… I won’t be doing that until after she’s born. 😉

Modification Monday… Fail. But Oatmeal Cookies Perfected!

For the first time ever, I haven’t heard back from any of the people I’ve contacted for a Mod Monday. I’m sorry, guys!! I’m sure I’ll hear back from the knitters I’ve contacted soon. In the meantime, may I beg forgiveness with cookie?

G calls these the best oatmeal cookies in the world… and I’m going to go ahead and agree with him.
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First, let’s make sure our expectations are in line. First up- these are plain, old fashioned, no-frills oatmeal cookies. There are no chocolate chips. It’s not a fancy cookie. But hot damn, they are perfection. if you like a classic oatmeal cookie, then this is the cookie for you.

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats*
  • 1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • pinch off salt
  • 1 cup golden raisins 

* The oats need to be rolled oats- not the weird, quaker
oats flaked stuff that looks like it’s been swept up off the floor of a
processing plant. This really affects the texture.
  
Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F (190C) 
  2. In a bowl, mix together rolled oats, flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside. 
  3. In a large bowl, cream together butter and sugar with an electric mixer until light and fluffy.
  4. Beat in egg, vanilla and molasses. 
  5. Stir dry ingredients into butter mixture until combined, add raisins. 
  6. Shape into 2 inch balls and arrange on an ungreased baking sheet. 
  7. Bake for 10-12 minutes, until lightly golden brown.
  8. Try not to eat them all at once. 

That’s it!

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